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book review

Radical Embodied Cognitive Science.

“Radical” is an understatement. This book isn’t just cognitive science with digital computers and no explicit symbolic thought. This is cognitive science via coupled oscillators — without even a hint of anything that could look like a predicate, a concept or even an explicit variable (Implicit variables are OK, since the …

Barbara Gail Montero’s Thought in Action

Thought in Action by Barbara Gail Montero is the dual of many of the books I’ve discussed on this site. Where the others could be characterized by “in contrast to our beliefs that the bulk of our daily lives consists of conscious activity, it is actually primarily unconscious”, her work …

Pylyshyn’s Things and Places

Things and Places by Zenon Pylyshyn In keeping with my current goal of pushing the requirements for “conscious thought” down to an absolute minimum, I picked up (downloaded) a copy of Pylyshyn’s Things and Places. Pylyshyn is a long time vision researcher and this book serves as summary of his …

Review: Vibrant Matter Jane Bennett

As others have noted, Jane Bennett’s Vibrant Matter is a significant book — it’s what I was looking for when I started down the OOO path (which admittedly reflects more upon me than upon OOO or Vibrant Matter (VM)). VM is sort of the dual of OOO: whereas OOO is …

New Aesthetic, New Anxieties

This post was provoked by New Aesthetics, New Anxieties that was provoked by the new aesthetics movement. I will start with a few comments on the book (which I highly recommend BTW). One point that the book clarified for me, even though NA isn’t explicitly mentioned, is that the “algorithmic …

A Universe Of Consciousness How Matter Becomes Imagination

A Universe of Consciousness by Edelman and Tononi — this is the third Edelman book I’ve read, the others being: The Remembered Present, and Neural Darwinism. The central idea in Edelman’s work is neuronal group selection,  shown below (figure 7.2 from the book — I’m reproducing this, since wikipedia doesn’t adequately capture …

Ambient Commons by Malcolm McCullough

While reading this Ambient Commons I bounced between thinking Cool this is someone who’s using data/being the environment without the digital detox meme to No, he just wants us to drop our phones to No, this really is a different take. Upon finishing the book I settled on the idea …

Strangers To Ourselves (STO).

My feelings about Strangers To Ourselves are colored by my having read it after Beyond The Brain (BTB). I have a difficult time giving it appropriate credit since much of its content was subsumed by BTB, even though the book has a lot going for it: interesting examples, good writing, etc. …